logo
Welcome to Lilliput Lane Cottages

presented by Viv Marston
 
 

 

   Crazy last chance sale list

   Books
   Pockets for deeds

   Introductions
   Retirements
   Annual fair

   Pictures of retired models (A-L)
   Pictures of retired models (M-Z)
   Pictures of original buildings

   Glossary
   Forgeries

   Links
   Terms and conditions

   Contact us

 

Glossary

This glossary is divided into two parts. The first section provides definitions for words and phrases related to collecting and producing Lilliput Lane cottages. The second section provides definitions for words and phrases related to the architecture of cottages and other buildings that Lilliput Lane has sculpted.

Collecting and producing Lilliput Lane cottages

add-on A part of a model that is not cast in Amorphite and is instead glued onto the model at the painting stage due to the difficulty of unmoulding the model with the object, the extremely fine detail required, or the desire to have the object in a different material such as metal for its realistic effect. Examples of add-ons are metalwork on a fence which might be photo-etched or a person who is cast in soft metal and painted before being glued onto the model.
Amorphite A compound unique to Lilliput Lane, composed of finely ground gypsum with other substances added to it which is used to cast models. Amorphite starts in a powder form. Water is added to it to create liquid Amorphite just before it is poured into a mould, as it sets very quickly at room temperature. A series of chemical reactions take place as the Amorphite sets, causing it to harden.
backstamp A marking found typically on the back or underside of a piece of china, a porcelain object, or other collectible item which identifies who manufactured the item and when it was produced. For Lilliput Lane cottages, the backstamp includes the words "Lilliput Lane" and a copyright year (except on some models produced in 1982), and the backstamp is usually found on the back or side of the cottage often in the grass or on the side of a rock or stone wall.
baize A coarse felt-like material that is custom-cut to cover the bottom of a model after it has been painted. Lilliput Lane has always used a green baize except on a few very old models where a brown baize was used.
block mould A box-shaped silicone rubber mould created from the sculptor's original wax. A box is constructed around the original wax and silicone rubber is poured into it to create the block mould. After the rubber is cured, the wax is removed (being destroyed as part of the removal process). The block mould is then cut with a scalpel and pinned back together so that it can be used to create two original masters.
block up The process of putting wax putty around an original master to take away all undercuts of the model (e.g., roof overhangs), which after smoothing creates a tapered shape. The blocked-up master is used in the creation of a plug.
cast The process of producing a production model from a production mould. The production mould is set upside down in a supporting plastic case to ensure it is not twisted or distorted in any way. Liquid Amorphite is poured into the mould while the mould is tapped to prevent air bubbles from being trapped. After confirming that all crevices in the mould are filled with Amorphite, a glass plate is slid over the top of the mould to ensure the base on the resulting model will be flat. Once the Amorphite has set, the glass plate is removed and the production mould is peeled back from around the model. The model is inspected for any flaws and then is fettled.
Casting Department The department at Lilliput Lane that casts production models in Amorphite using the production moulds created by the Mould Making Department.
certificate of authenticity A piece of paper included with most Lilliput Lane limited edition models that certifies the edition number of the particular piece in the limited series and also certifies the model is an authentic creation of Lilliput Lane. Most certificates of authenticy include a storycard on the reverse side if the model does not have a separate deed with a storycard or other leaflet providing information similar to a storycard.
clear plastic pattern Sheets of plastic that are vacuum formed over a plug. Having been formed over the plug, they are slightly larger than the original master. A sequence of processes is then applied to the clear plastic patterns to form plastic cases.
Colouration Studio The department at Lilliput Lane that researches possible colour schemes for a model based upon the colours of the original building (and similar buildings), the season of the year the model depicts and the specific foliage it has, etc. Numerous colour schemes are developed and evaluated, before one scheme is selected which will be used on the painting master.
colourway A version of a model that is identified by its unique colour scheme.
deed A piece of paper included with most Lilliput Lane cottages since April 1985 that transfers ownership of the sculpture to the collector and certifies the model is an authentic creation of Lilliput Lane. Since 1995, most deeds include a storycard on the reverse side. Note that a deed is not the same as a certificate of authenticity.
dip colour The base colour or colours that a model receives when it is dipped (some models are dipped in more than one colour to create a multi-tone effect). The dip colour is one of the primary colours used on the model, such as that of its stone walls, roof or ground, which minimizes or eliminates the need to subsequently paint some portions of the model.
dipping The process by which a newly cast model is placed into a special solution that seals the cast, providing an appropriate surface for painting, as well as providing a base colour for the model (referred to as the dip colour).
fettling The process performed by the Casting Department where a very sharp modelling knife is used to remove any excess Amorphite that is on a model that has just been cast, such as at an archway or other hollow area. Because an entire model is cast in a single step, when there is an open archway or other similar opening, the production mould has a very small separation under the opening to allow the mould to be peeled back around each side of the opening. This separation in the mould results in a shim of plaster being formed when the model is cast, which then has to be removed during fettling.
label A small sticker placed on the baize on the bottom of a model which is pre-printed with the name of the model, the words "Lilliput Lane" and some other information (a couple very old models had the model name handwritten with the rest of the label pre-printed). Over the years, various sizes, colours and styles of labels have been used by Lilliput Lane. Collectors should always be careful to confirm the authenticity of a model if considering the purchase of one that does not have an appropriate label on it. The label is positioned on the bottom of the model such that when looking at the front of the model and tipping it up, the label can be read.
limited edition A model whose production run is limited by either a pre-announced time (e.g., only available for 1 year) or size (e.g., only 2000 pieces will be made). Contrast this to an open edition.
master making mould The mould formed by injecting silicone rubber between the original master and the plastic case. Production masters are created using the master making mould.
Mould Making Department The department at Lilliput Lane that uses production masters and plastic cases to create production moulds for the Casting Department.
open edition A model whose production run is not limited by either a pre-announced time or size. Contrast this to a limited edition.
original master One of two epoxy resin casts which are solid first generation copies of the original wax, produced using the block mould. The original masters are formed by pouring epoxy resin into the block mould. After curing, the pins in the block mould are removed so the two pieces of the block mould can be separated, easing the de-moulding of the resin cast. One original master is kept as-is, and the other is blocked up.
original wax The original sculpture for a model, created by the R & D Department in beeswax that has been mixed with other substances to form a material that can be easily worked with, yet is hard enough to retain the extremely fine detail that is sculpted into it. The original wax will be identical in shape, size and detail to the final model with the possible exception of a few add-ons.
painting master The master copy of a model, painted by the Colouration Studio, which depicts the approved colour scheme for a model. All copies of the model produced are painted identical to the painting master.
plastic case A casing made of plastic that has been vacuum formed over the plug, with flanges so it can be bolted to a board and with holes into which silicone rubber can be injected and air removed. The first plastic case is used to produce the master making mould.
plinth A decorative wooden base placed underneath a Lilliput Lane cottage. Plinth also refers to a base that supports a column, external wall, etc., in a building, or the base that supports statues or memorials.
plug A solid resin cast, identical in shape to the blocked up original master, made by pouring resin into a thin plastic sheet that was vacuum formed over that master. After curing, the plug is screwed in place on a board. The mounted plug is used to vacuum form clear plastic patterns.
primary market The market created by the buying and selling of a collectible item while that item is still being produced by the original manufacturer. The primary market usually implies that the sellers are retailers who have been authorized by the manufacturer to sell the item, and the sale is the original sale of a particular piece. Contrast this to the secondary market.
production master Resin casts that are solid second generation copies of the original wax, made by pouring resin into the master making mould. The production masters are mounted on boards, and are used by the Mould Making Department to create production moulds.
production model A copy of a model that has been produced by casting it from a production mould. These models are painted and sold by Lilliput Lane.
production mould Moulds produced in the Mould Making Department by injecting silicone rubber between a production master and a plastic case. Production moulds are used by the Casting Department to cast production models.
R & D Department The Research and Development Department at Lilliput Lane that researches cottages and their architecture, develops drawings and paintings of possible models, and sculpts the original wax version of a model. The R & D department also investigates and develops new ways to enhance models such as by adding snow, lighting, or pastille burners.
retired model A model that is no longer being produced and whose master moulds have been destroyed. When a model retires, Lilliput Lane might still have some remaining inventory that was produced prior to the retirement date that it sells to retailers, and retailers might still have some inventory that they sell at either the last retail price or at a secondary market price. Once any remaining inventory is sold, the model will only be available through the secondary market.
secondary market The market created by the buying and selling of a collectible item after that item is no longer produced by the original manufacturer. It can also refer to the second or other subsequent sale of a piece when the model is still available on the primary market. For example, a collector might buy a piece on the primary market, and if the collector then sells it to someone else, that is considered to be a secondary market transaction, even if the model is still available on the primary market.
stock number A number assigned to a model by Lilliput Lane to uniquely identify it for manufacturing and ordering purposes. Stock numbers are in the form of the letter "L" followed by 4 digits (e.g., "L1234") though older models did not have "L" at the start of the stock number and the numbers were usually 3 to 5 digits long. A few olders models had more than one stock number assigned, and there are a few instances of when the same stock number was used on more than one model.
storycard Information on the reverse side of a deed or certificate of authenticity that usually includes the location and picture of the original building upon which the Lilliput Lane model is based, along with a paragraph of text describing the history of the original building, the village it is from, and/or some relevant tradition, occupation or interesting facts. Deeds for most Lilliput Lane models issued since 1995 include a storycard on the reverse side.
Tooling Department The department at Lilliput Lane that takes the original wax produced by the R & D department and goes through a large number of steps to produce the master making mould.
version The result of a non-trivial and intentional physical change in the original master for a model, or the result of a non-trivial and intentional colouration change in the painting master for a model, which can be described and to which a collector might attribute a different value. As Lilliput Lane cottages are handmade, there will be subtle differences among all pieces but these differences do not imply different versions. With older Lilliput Lane models, there was also a lot of variability in the weight of different pieces, and these differences are not considered variations. Minor changes in the name of a model as printed on the model's label or differences in the style of label on a model are not considered variations of the model, either.

Architecture

bargeboard A board that may be ornamental which is attached to the gable end of a roof to hide the ends of the timbers that form the roof.
bay The space between pairs of cross-frames in a timber frame building.
bay window A window that projects out from a wall. Also called a bow window. If on an upper floor of a building, a bay window is referred to as an oriel window.
black and white One of several common names that refer in general to timber frame buildings. The name comes from the black painted timbers and white infill panels seen on many timber frame buildings.
box frame construction A type of timber framing in which the side wall frames and exterior cross-frames are separate from the roof frame, and the weight of the roof is carried on the framed side walls of the building, without the use of bays.
box frame walling One of three types of walls used in box frame construction: large framing, close studding, or small framing.
brick nogging The use of brick instead of wattle and daub to infill the panels in timber framing, with the brick arranged in either simple random or decorative herringbone patterns.
catslide A pitched roof on a house (often two or more storeys in height) that extends at the same pitch over parts of that house, often an extension, on a lower level.
close studding A type of box frame walling that uses closely spaced storey-height vertical timbers. It is the most extravagant of the box frame walling types.
cob cottage A cottage whose walls are formed of cob (a mixture of straw, unburnt clay and sometimes gravel, which is shaped by hand or foot without any special tools or forms).
cross-frames The exterior and interior frames of a timber frame building that are perpendicular to the ridge of the roof.
cruck construction A type of timber framing in which pairs of large timbers (each referred to as a cruck) rise typically from the ground and meet at an apex at the roof of a building. The timbers may be straight, curved or elbowed at the level of the eaves. The pair of crucks are joined together by a horizontal tie beam or collar to make an "A" frame. Bays are formed between every two pairs of crucks.
dormer (or dormer window) A window that projects vertically from a sloping roof, with either the main roof or a separate roof going over the top of the projection.
eaves The part of a roof that meets or overhangs the walls of a building.
eyebrow Low dormers in a roof over which the roof is carried in a continuous curve.
floor frame The beams and joists joined together to form the floor of a timber frame building.
gable The triangular upper part of a wall at the end of a pitched roof.
Georgian The style of architecture common during the reigns of George I to George IV (1714 to 1830). Styles during the reign of George IV (c.1790 to 1830) are sometimes not included in Georgian and instead referred to as Regency. Classical forms and motifs are predominant in Georgian architecture.
half-timber One of several common names that refer in general to timber frame buildings. It is not known if the term "half-timber" derives from halving trees or from the exterior walls of these buildings that were half timber and half plaster.
hip of a roof The edge formed where two sloping sides of a roof meet.
infill panels The spaces between the exposed timbers in the walls of a timber frame building, commonly filled with wattle and daub.
jettied wall A wall on an upper floor that overhangs the face of the wall on the storey below. This provides not only structural advantages, but also allows for better use of limited space and protection of the lower wall from rain.
large framing A type of box frame walling that uses square or nearly-square panels that are storey-height and may include diagonal braces or decorative timbers.
limewash A mixture of lime and water used to coat a wall.
lintel A horizontal support across the top of a door or window.
magpie One of several common names that refer in general to timber frame buildings. The reference to the magpie bird is from the black painted timbers and white infill panels seen on many timber frame buildings.
mullion A narrow vertical bar made of stone or wood that divides a window, placed between adjacent panes of glass.
pantiles An S-shaped roof tile, placed in such a way that the down curve of one tile overlaps the up curve of the next one.
pargeting A patterned or decorative layer of plaster or mortar on the exterior wall of a building.
Picturesque A style of architecture from the late 1700s to the mid-1800s that focused on the aesthetics of a building, inspiring a rustic and nostalgic feeling in the observer through its use of rough, unusual, or irregular forms while being visually appealing. Picturesque architecture incorporated the beauty of nature and landscaping with concepts from Gothic architecture and the ruins of antiquity.
plinth A base that supports a column, external wall, etc., in a building, or the base that supports statues or memorials. Plinth also refers to a decorative wooden base placed underneath a Lilliput Lane cottage.
post and truss construction A type of timber framing in which the side wall frames and exterior cross-frames are separate from the frame for the roof, and the weight of the roof is taken to the ground through interior cross-frames spaced at intervals along the length of the building, forming bays similar to that in cruck construction.
Regency The style of architecture common during the reign of George IV (c.1790 to 1830), sometimes included as part of Georgian architecture.
ridge of a roof The edge formed where two sloping sides of a roof meet at the top.
roof frame The purlins and windbraces, which are joined together with the cross-frames, to form the structure for the roof in a timber frame building.
side wall frames The frames forming the two exterior walls of a timber frame building that are parallel to the ridge of the roof.
small framing A type of box frame walling that uses two square or nearly square panels per storey-height.
thatch The oldest type of roof covering and, until the Industrial Revolution, the most common, composed of either long straw, combed wheat reed or water reed.
timber frame A building where the primary framework is made of wood. The four types of frames which form the building are the cross-frames, floor frame, roof frame and side wall frames. Three primary styles of timber framing are box frame construction, cruck construction and post and truss construction. Common names for timber frame buildings include black and white, half-timber, and magpie.
vernacular architecture A style of architecture where ordinary people use readily-available local materials to build homes and other functional buildings in traditional styles. As local materials and weather vary from one area to another, vernacular architecture styles have corresponding changes that can be observed in various parts of a building such as the chimney, roof, walls, and windows.
wattle and daub A traditional style of infill panels for walls in a timber frame building. Oak staves are cut to fit between the top and bottom member of each panel, and wattles (usually hazel or cleft oak twigs and branches) are then woven around this strong structure (similar to basket weaving). Both sides of this wattle panel are then daubed (liberally coated) with a mixture of clay, dung and straw. The panel is then limewashed or painted.
weather boarding A series of horizontal boards nailed to outside walls with edges overlapping to keep out the rain.


Please contact us with suggestions for additional words to add to our glossary.

 
   

Using this site means you agree to its terms and conditions.

Copyright ©1997 - 2017, Viv Marston. All rights reserved.